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October 18th, 2013
07:38 PM ET

Cupp: Native Americans have real problems

In a debate over the name of the Washington Redskins, host S.E. Cupp argues that the Native American community faces more important issues.

Posted by
Filed under: Debates • Eleanor Holmes Norton • Larry Elder • S.E. Cupp • Van Jones
soundoff (62 Responses)
  1. chad johnson

    Elder just spanked that poor commie. Why does CNN even have a black nationalist like Van jones on their show anyway? This is why you are so poorly rated.

    October 23, 2013 at 5:40 pm | Reply
  2. Michael

    I really feel like this is the time to take back our identity as so many other people of color and orientations have taken back their identity.

    Blacks were once considered solely as Property, Women were inferior and submissive, Latinos were Illegals and Wetbacks, and Gays were called Faggots and Abominations. Through time and perseverance, they all took their identity back. Black America has achieved so much, we have a Black President! Women are leaders, CEOs, and they run for high office. Latinos vote and have changed the entire dynamic of America. And Gays can marry! Holy smokes!

    Today, most people cringe at the word nigger and faggot, and because those groups took it back. And perhaps white America gave it back to them.

    All I ask it that Native Americans take their identity back. The Native ethnicity has been logo-ized and branded. As other people of color have.

    Latinos were branded as Banditos, Asians were branded as emperors or launderers, women were incompetent, Blacks were just all together portrayed wrongly, and Gays and Lesbians were considered something anti-biblical. United, they have done so much to fix that and recapture what was theirs. Their identity. All of it. The good and the bad.

    Now why can't we do this for the Native ethnicity? One could say, the Native group is the last to see equality and justice.

    As a communications/marketing professional, it now today's fashion to champion something that does not have racial implications. Ford, Nike, Gucci, Pepsi, Kraft Food. These brands do not have mascots, and if they do, then they are dropping, and being banished to the breakfast cereal aisle. And even those are not race-based. None of them!

    Here in DC, we have the Washington Nationals. They don't have a mascot, and neither do the Cincinnati Reds, the Cleveland Browns, Green Bay, the A's, the Dodgers. And they are doing just fine.

    This is something that we all need to get behind and take back our identity, because it is in the hands of others, whether we like that or not.

    October 22, 2013 at 4:17 pm | Reply
    • serge

      the non natives will never reconized the natives because they dont want to admit what they did to us was wrong we fight for every thing we have even to this very day we fight alot of stuff like racism im from Maine and our governor is dead set against us doing any thing that would improve our lives and if your a felon and ask him for a pardon and your native forget it but if your non native he will give it to them what would you call that we never gave up even though non natives did alot to us like killed our elders children woman man even wiped out hole tribes we never bowed down we stood up and said no more and we are a very disliked race for it just because we stay strong even today hope I sheaded some light on the subject

      October 23, 2013 at 6:58 am | Reply
  3. Chief Iliniwek

    And what about the Atlanta Braves or Cleveland Indians? If the Chief had to go then they all must go.

    October 21, 2013 at 4:06 pm | Reply
    • Richard Eckert, Ph.D.

      Just get rid of the racist stereotypes and put an end to it. Why not teach respect instead of promoting racism?

      October 21, 2013 at 11:10 pm | Reply
    • tomahawk903

      The Chief is right. We are in the 21st century and we are still using 19th century names for NFL teams.It is time to move ahead and lay the swords down. especially the owners who have and use the Native Indian Names for there own franchise and and teams.

      October 30, 2013 at 2:16 pm | Reply
  4. Richard Eckert, Ph.D.

    In the Fall of 2011 I co-presented at the Midwest Culturally Inclusive Conference. The presentation was called "Mascot Defenders: What Part of OUCH Dion't They Understand?" As part of the presentation I asked the audience to think about inventing a race-based sports mascot that was White and derogatory.

    After a lively multicultural discussion on that theme I showed a slide of cartoon character Stewie. You know know that evil little spoiled brat? I put forward the question -- how would Whites react if a Person of Color owned a sports franchise and used a Stewie like character for a team mascot/logo? What if the Person of Color who owned the team claimed that in using Stewie for a mascot/logo were honoring Euroamericans? We could even call them the Washington Stewballs (not to be confused with Joan Baez song about a horse called "Stewball"), Hey, Stewie's head is even shaped like a football. and therefore honoring a major part of American culture Wouldn't it be a problem for Anglos if everyone else used stereotypic Stewiieballs and generalized the evil brat's behavior as representing ALL Whites? So why then is it acceptable for a White owner to financially profit from trademarks of a harmful racial slur? I seriously doubt Whites would ever put up with be depicted as Stewie, especially if it could be shown to harm White children. Why not start teaching respect instead of teaching racism?

    October 21, 2013 at 11:16 am | Reply
    • Patrick

      You would make Stewie a mascot for a sports team?? Absolutely!! DO IT!!!!! I would love that!!! I would be a huge fan!!! Stewie is hilarious!!! Good argument Mr. Ph.D....maybe you do not know as much about cultures as you think you do.

      October 21, 2013 at 10:50 pm | Reply
      • Richard Eckert, Ph.D.

        Stewie represents American Culture far more than the Washington mascot/logo. Unfortunately, racism is part of American Culture, surely part of American History, past and present. If you like Stewie and can convince Synder to adopt Stewie – wonderful. However, there is a variance of opinion out there as to just how evil Stewie is. That some are fond of his evilness is not a surprise. Do they represent the views of all Americans? No. A majority of Americans? I have no idea. A poll ,however, is not needed. Stewballs, unlike the R-word, is not defined as a racial slur in the dictionary. The R word is. Supporting Stewie isn't supporting racism. Buying Stewie t shirts for the kids isn't teaching kids that racism is ok. So – go ahead and start a petition advocating a team change name to the Washington Stewballs, Hail to the Stewballs, Hail victory!

        October 25, 2013 at 8:20 am |
    • Gunderson

      Gunderson here. Chief Cook, and Bottle Washer. You should know, one person did try to straighten out the world, and you know what they did to him. So i would be careful in trying to straighten out the world.

      October 22, 2013 at 11:46 am | Reply
      • Dr. Edmund Bruyere

        It is obvious that you are not moderating racism. In addition to having my PhD I am also a US Army veteran. My personal address is on the web and you are more than welcome to visit me so that we can have a conversation about your disgusting and obsolete racism and ignorance. Our voice as American Indians' will be heard peacefully soon. It is for the future of our children that we fight to eradicate racism in all forms from public space. These children include those who are White also. We do not want them to live with the shame of those who have come before them. Again, my address can be found on the web. I would love to have a face to face conversation about your repulsive ignorance. Best Regards, Dr. Edmund Bruyere

        October 22, 2013 at 1:39 pm |
  5. Dr. Edmund Bruyere

    Hello. I am Ojibwe. I am also running for Mayor of Minneapolis. Thank you for making our on-going struggles an issue. I have been very frustrated with the fact that our people (all American Indian tribes) have been left out of the national, state, and local conversations. In fact, the media here in Minneapolis is silent about my candidacy. I am curious about why you did not invite an American Indian panelist. I have a PhD from Loyola University Chicago and would be more than willing to be a panelist. Thanks for taking up this cause and being a voice for our people. Best Regards, Dr. Edmund Bruyere

    October 21, 2013 at 9:50 am | Reply
    • Richard Eckert, Ph.D.

      Yeah I am curious about that as well. Did you try Richard King who has written extensively on the subject? Susan Shown Harjo who testified before congress? Native psychologists who convinced the American Psychological Association to put out a position paper on the subject of the harm that race-based mascots cause. Doesn't seem like Crossfire did their research this time. btw I am Ojibwe.

      October 21, 2013 at 12:28 pm | Reply
  6. A Godbodian

    The saddest thing is for all of your doctorate and politically correct thoughts, you forget three major facts; 1.) Although some may find it offensive, the vast majority of Native Americans do not. Its kinda like that movie Django where everyone white or black used the N word gratuitously, the NAACP had an issue but the majority of African Americans had no issue with the movie and often enjoyed the film. 2.) As such THIS IS THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE and much like the ENGLISH LANGUAGE context, purposely construed and implied IS KING. Its the reason Caucasian so desiring to use the N word are so confused. Because we as African Americans in the majority determine its value. Its much like women being able to use the B word with their closest friends but all men knowing that our usage of the word towards them is taboo. See the context provided is the fact that in the majority, Native Americans could care less. As a person who is a decendant of both the African American race and Cherokee as my great grandmother was full blooded Cherokee woman whos immediate family escaped relocation by working the docks of New Orleans. We have always been intouch with our family that resides in Oklahoma and New Orleans. Being that we relocated from the deep South to DC. We've been fans for sometime and ALL of our family are REDSKINS fans. We often send our family members jerseys that they cannot acquire there. And lastly, 3.) What appalls me the most about your self-righteous claim to assist my people, while you use BOTH SIDES of my ancestry to prove your point, THE TERM REDSKIN WAS NEVER RACIAL as my people's skin is NOT RED. The term originated when Europeans settlers saw that some other Indian tribes would decorate themselves with Red Ocre or Vermillion. It had nothing to do with race, although it can be argued that it was cultural. NOW what WE/I do find negative or disparaging is the use of words like savage or INDIAN as we were never either.

    While I appreciate what you're attempting to say and do, you don't speak for all of us and you're not right. Racism isn't as black and white as you make it, which some would argue demonstrates that you yourself know nothing of real racism. REAL RACISM IS MORE THAN NAME CALLING, REAL RACISM IS MURDER, CENTURIES OF OPPRESSION, DEGRADATION BY LAWS THAT FAR MEANT TO BE JUST, ET CETERA. You're just someone trying to do the right thing, not realizing that those people that are offended ARE SPEAKING and the ones that are silent, are so FOR A EQUALLY JUSTIFIABLE REASON.

    October 21, 2013 at 4:19 am | Reply
    • Richard Eckert, Ph.D.

      There are two primary issues that Archie from Lansing failed to address. First, do race-based mascots/logos, such as those trademarked by Dan Synder's organization harm Native children? The answer is yes. The empirical studies confirming that have been examined by the American Psychological Association and the answer was YES. The second issue is – Do race based mascots/logos cause harm to non-Native Children? The answer again is YES. How? Community support for race-based ascots/logos teaches children that racism is not only ok, but something the community will defend. Archie from Lansing fails to recognize that race-based mascots/logos cause harm to EVERYONE, not just First Peoples. I am a enrolled member of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Band of Ojibwe and I strongly object to race-based mascots/logos.

      October 21, 2013 at 10:53 am | Reply
  7. Derrick Bayard

    Should the Washington football team change its name?

    I believe it should. The history of the term – "Redskins," dictates thus. In case there are those who do not know, – the term originated from the bounty put on the indigenous people of this continent. Their bodies being too heavy to carry and so many of them being killed, all that was required to prove that you were part of the GENOCIDE, was a scalp; with red skin, under the hair; to stop unscrupulous people from just killing anyone (white people), and cashing in. Martin Luther King Jr. said: "injustice to one, is injustice to all." Just because I am not a member of an indigenous tribe, does not mean that this is not harmful to me for my children. Imagine the self-esteem of the native children, when they realized that this country, killed off their ancestors and no one will stop them from adding insult to that injury.

    I often say, what would happen if – we found out Dan Snyder's grandmother's name, and we started using her name to describe something disgusting and foul. Imagine if we all started saying – "excuse me, I have to go to the bathroom and drop a Maggie Snyder (not her real name). Then somebody else would say – "well, be careful, the dog Maggie Snydered, on the rug." "By the way, while you are in there, brush your teeth; your breath smells like – Maggie Snyder. How do you think Dan Snyder would feel? How would YOU feel if your grandmother's name was being used. Well, this is small, compared to someone using a derogatory term about your ancestors who were murdered en masse.

    My choice for a new name – "Pigskins." It fits because, "pigskin," is a slang term for football. Washington's offensive line was known as – "The Hogs." They could redesign a logo; one with a really mean looking pig, with a burgundy and gold helmet. They could still be called – "The Skins."

    Problem solved... Change the name!

    October 21, 2013 at 1:04 am | Reply
  8. Fab Four

    As soon as the name changes, all of their alcoholism, joblessness etc..will vanish into thin air. SPARE!

    October 20, 2013 at 11:06 pm | Reply
    • Richard Eckert, Ph.D.

      No – social problems that result from colonization will take a long time to undo. The key is that the social problems are interrelated and that mascots are a social problem. End the stupid mascots and the potential for progress in resolving other problems exists. Failing to get rid of mascots intensifies the other social problems. Perhaps someday Euroamericans embrace the motto of enlightenment and actually have the courage to know..

      October 21, 2013 at 11:15 pm | Reply
      • Lizzie

        The government makes sure that the INDIANS are kept on the reservation! the Bureau for Indian Affairs believes to this day, INDIANS are to dumb to controll their own lives.

        October 24, 2013 at 11:25 am |
  9. tomahawk903

    Who is these 89% of tribes that were polled? Were they Apache`s? Sioux? Lakota`s? Cherokees? As a Native Born Cherokee, I sure wasn`t called to give my opinion. and How did the verify there Native Ameican status? did they just ask if you are a Native American Indian? and how many so called Native were polled? I have serious doubts that any were true Indians and with that being said. Larry Elder does not speak for me and I suggest he stay with his own ethnic group

    October 20, 2013 at 8:03 pm | Reply
    • James

      Team mascots are usually meant to strike fear into the hearts of their opponent. Lions, tigers and bears. I see no offense in the name "Braves" for instance. It is a term of respect and refers to the courage of all of you Native Americans. But this term is a derogatory reference and a racist term. The sad history of genocide that my people, white men, committed against these proud nations is something I'm as ashamed of as slavery. The least we can do is show the dignity and respect all of you deserve.

      October 20, 2013 at 10:12 pm | Reply
    • California

      Your "opinion" on the poll is noted. Everyone has one.

      October 20, 2013 at 10:14 pm | Reply
  10. Richard Eckert, Ph.D.

    I have studied mascot controversies for over 20 years now and I have yet to read a new argument that support the use of race-based mascots. Do Natives have more pressing issues? Please tell me what could be more pressing than one's individual, tribal, and inter-tribal identities? The Congressional testimony is there to read, the American Psychological Association's position paper is there, the peer reviewed scholarly articles are out there. There is no gap in the literature when it comes to identifying race-based mascots as detrimental to the self esteem of Native children. If people are truly interested in confronting the social problems that exist in communities of First Native Peoples, why not start with an area that transcends problems in educational achievement, healthcare, suicide, alcoholism etc etc. The self-esteem beaten by colonialism can be linked to most of those problems, BUT I think it is also important to critique why American society works so hard to retain race-based mascots in the first place. The history of mascots is directly linked to a longing of the majority to extricate themselves from admission that the North American holocaust ever took place. CNN really should put together a documentary that addresses the history of race based mascots in America, where they came from and why. Yes, it matters that Natives are offended by race-based slurs. The Washington logo is a non-Indian perception of Natives. It perpetuates not only a racial slur, but all the baggage that comes with it. The commentators asked if a team based on the n-word would be offensive. The better comparison would be the Washington N-word with a logo in the image borrowed from Amos and Andy.

    October 20, 2013 at 3:56 pm | Reply
    • billy

      Hi Doc,
      I worked on the Shoshone/Arapaho reservation as a teacher and have a BS in cultural anthropology. You hit the nail on the head. To add, t I believe the victors adopt the pet names to co-opt cultural identity of the defeated culture is some sort of perverted salute to them as one time adversaries. Names like Braves, and Warriors however, a far different than "Redskins," which is historically a demeaning moniker. The argument used now, is the same southern racists use/d regarding african-americans. "We've called them nig–s forever, you're attacking my heritage."

      October 20, 2013 at 6:49 pm | Reply
    • Patrick

      Educated beyond any usefulness!! The Redskins are a privately owned team and there is no reason why they should be bullied into changing the name, regardless of who finds it offensive. If the NFL or our stupid government want the name changed then they should buy it, change the name, and then try to sell it. I also find it extremely disturbing how a small percentage of people who find it offensive can force the issue on the rest of us. What ever happened to majority rules? Also if you do not like the name then do not watch them. No one is forcing people to be a Redskins fan.

      October 21, 2013 at 10:46 pm | Reply
      • Richard Eckert, Ph.D.

        Patrick – I do not have a constitutional right to paint hate speech on the car I own even though the car is my property. the issue is whether racial slurs such as those used by Dan Snyder's organization violate my civil right to enjoy a football game the same as everyone else. When mascots/logos are promoting racial stereotypes I am prevented from enjoying the game the same as others. That is a violation of my rights. At issue is whether Snyder's defense of racism causes harm to Indian children. The answer is yes it does. I do not have the right to go making racial slurs. That's nonsense.

        October 21, 2013 at 11:22 pm |
      • Falling

        Majority rules? Isn't that exactly the sort of imperialistic attitude of the days of yore? It does not matter how you describe yourselves, we will define you as we please.

        October 22, 2013 at 12:42 am |
      • serge

        that they are a team not one person that is why the name doesnt bother me but if you calle one person that thats not good you wanna talk about being bullied look at what non natives do every day to natives that bulling to me they take from us they killed us gave us smallpox yet we lived though it all even today I walk down the road I get people saying racist slurs of they pretend im not there so they dont have to serve me that is a bully sir

        October 22, 2013 at 8:26 am |
      • Kenny Smith

        Well said Patrick , and this is just my opinion , because everyone has one, I think some people get enjoyment out of thinking up crazy ideas and getting a few other depressed souls to because they have nothing better to do , the term redskin for me just means another word for indian , just as white = Caucasian or French = francais, I've never heard it as being derogatory in any way . Indians weren't treated well in the past , but that's over with . get a life people !!!!!!

        October 25, 2013 at 3:28 am |
      • tomahawk903

        Well said Patrick , and this is just my opinion , because everyone has one, I think some people get enjoyment out of thinking up crazy ideas and getting a few other depressed souls to because they have nothing better to do , the term redskin for me just means another word for indian , just as white = Caucasian or French = francais, I’ve never heard it as being derogatory in any way . Indians weren’t treated well in the past , but that’s over with . get a life people !!!!!!

        Well Said? on what planet do you live on Kenny? Just anolther word for a Indian? Is that how you think of your Native American Indian is just another word? I am a Native Born Cherokee Indian and I can assure you..I breath the same air. Bleed the same color. and eat the same food as you you. You truly need to educate yourself on what the word`Redskin derives from and maybe, you will see what is wrong with the name. Until you do the fault lies within yourself.

        October 29, 2013 at 4:04 pm |
      • Richard Eckert, Ph.D.

        Well said? Let me get this straight – if I am a high school drop then I am dumb Indian, but if I have a doctorate degree I am educated beyond usefulness??????? No doubt an uneducated Indian is what many Euroamericans would prefer. I guess the author thinks that remaining ignorant is useful. Some people's ignorance amounts to an orgasm of intellectual anarchy and that is exactly what defending the Washington logo amounts to. There is no historically factual connection between the logo and any tribe that ever resided in what is now Washington, D.C. There is however historical connection with racism as the team and its previous owner being a driving force preventing African Americans from playing in the NFL. The image does not honor any Indian. The cheers at the stadium do not respect Native cultures. The term itself it derogatory by dictionary definition. The defense of the logo is consistent with the history of mascot defenders. Yet some individuals commenting would prefer that I play stupid and ignore the facts - so they can maintain their fetish for racialism without being challenged. I do understand. Education empowers Natives and you don't like that.

        October 30, 2013 at 10:19 am |
      • Richard Eckert, Ph.D.

        Well Kenny - “The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are full of doubts, while the stupid ones are full of confidence.” (Bukowski)

        October 30, 2013 at 10:43 am |
    • Gunderson

      Ye got a education did ye? Well good for you.

      October 22, 2013 at 12:24 pm | Reply
      • Richard Eckert, Ph.D.

        Education is certainly important. Do racist mascots/logos have an impact on Indian Education? The answer is yes.

        Fryberg, Stephanie. 2011. Stolen Identities: The Impact of Racist Stereotypes on Indigenous Peoples.” The US Senate Indian Affairs Committee (May 5, 2011).

        Fryberg, Stephanie A, Hazel Rose Markus, Daphna Oyersman, Joseph M. Stone. 2008. “Of Warrior Chiefs and Indian Princesses: The Psychological Consequences of American Indian Mascots.” Basic and Applied Social Psychology 30:208-218.

        Do the mascots/logos harm non Indians? YES. American Psychological Associations stated, "Undermining the educational experiences of members of all communities-especially those who have had little or no contact with Indigenous peoples. The symbols, images and mascots teach non-Indian children that it's acceptable to participate in culturally abusive behavior and perpetuate inaccurate misconceptions about American Indian culture."
        http://www.apa.org/pi/oema/resources/indian-mascots.aspx

        October 25, 2013 at 8:43 am |
  11. California

    Interesting how 90% of native Americans don't have a problem with it.

    The only ones have a problem with the Redskins name are the politically correct dolts.

    October 20, 2013 at 3:06 pm | Reply
    • serge

      im passamaquoddy native if it not meant to be a slur then I dont see any problem with it dont get me wrong I love who I am but that slur died a long time ago we should focus on other stuff like whats happend to my people over the years we atleast deserve at least some one to say sorry for what happend to you that would be good to me

      October 21, 2013 at 9:54 am | Reply
      • Sooner61

        The slur doesn't die if people continue to use it Serge. The ignorance is perpetuated for another generation. There is a simple question everyone should ask. Is it right or wrong? If you even hesitate, it is wrong. Don't pass on the ignorance.

        October 21, 2013 at 4:54 pm |
      • serge

        no the word to me doesnt mean what everybody else thinks it means that was the past this is the future you must learn to forgive and not hold on to the past there is a lot worse they call us I think we need to focus our attention on the here and now he could change the name but he wont but thats the way non natives act its not acceptable we have been here a long time and no one even says any thing about it some things are not better left unsaid were being cut out of history books no one says anything about that so many people wont know what happend to us in the past but I always tell my children about our history like my elders im keeping up with some of the old ways by passing down stories about native people my grandfather taught me so much and when he passed I kept the passamaquoddy way of life and handed it down to my children and its sometimes hard being a single dad like myself he told me there is alot worse some one can call you then rs and yes my skin is reddish brownish when you call a non native white do they find it offensive?

        October 21, 2013 at 6:00 pm |
    • Sooner61

      Who says 90% don't have a problem with it? I am a Cherokee tribal member, and I got a problem with it. Nobody polled me. You call someone a redskin where I come from and your body will never be found.

      October 21, 2013 at 4:52 pm | Reply
  12. Eddie Fonseca

    Micki Free a Native American guitarist and former band member of the band Shalamar which has their famous song This is for the lover in you, which was popular song with African American's across America and the world as being the best slow RB song and was done by the singer Babyface as well. The difference with Micki Free he did not accept being Native American would be an excuse not to earn a descent living, in America he worked hard for his money like most Native American's and they would agree not all of them drink and live of the government wealthfare system. Being an American who has lot's of Native American friends they are well educated and hold jobs from our doctors and Legal Assistants working in fields from Healthcare and our Legal to be a positive role models for all Native Americans across America. When we think of Native American's in America the first thing we think about is a bunch of guys beating a drum because it's part of their culture, or we associate them as people drinking booze all the time. These are all stereotypes which are not true because the next time we are sick in hospital it might be a Native American nurse who treats us and we must as American's start to learn and appreciate Native American culture for years to come.

    October 19, 2013 at 11:20 pm | Reply
  13. Paul Rainwater

    SE Cupp asks "but Where Does it end"? with her argumentative sarcastic illogical ignorance. FROM ME to SE: IT DOESN'T END YOU IDIOT, as long as their are human beings on this planet and given human nature, sadly the fight against ignorance and racism will continue. Moreover this Larry Elder guy is a really hateful angry person, don't think I would even sit at the same table with a creep like him and this SE Cup chick is a nasty piece of work, OMG CNN found some really horrible people to host and appear as guests here.

    October 19, 2013 at 8:06 pm | Reply
  14. LtButRt

    Cupp, It is the ignorance like the opinion you express that is part of the problem. You don't get it.

    October 19, 2013 at 3:23 pm | Reply
    • Paul Rainwater

      SE Cupp asks "but Where Does it end"? with her argumentative sarcastic illogical ignorance. FROM ME to SE: IT DOESN'T END YOU IDIOT, as long as there are human beings on this planet and given human nature, sadly the fight against ignorance and racism will continue.

      October 19, 2013 at 8:07 pm | Reply
    • California

      90% of all native Americans do not have a problem with it.

      The problem is with people butting into something that's not their problem. Sort of like the gay marriage don't you think?

      October 20, 2013 at 3:09 pm | Reply
  15. Ram Riva

    YES....they're called reservations....even today in the 21st century....are treated like 2nd class citizens

    October 19, 2013 at 2:14 pm | Reply
    • Fab Four

      They are free to leave the reservation any time they wish. No one is keeping them there

      October 20, 2013 at 11:03 pm | Reply
      • Richard Eckert, Ph.D.

        Why should Native have to leave the reservation Fab Four? That is a silly argument. Spend the time to investigate the foundations of Federal Indian Law before blurting out such nonsense. Your statement sound a great deal like a 1960's suggestion that African Americans can go back to Africa. Do your research fab four. Have the courage to know.

        October 21, 2013 at 11:27 pm |
  16. Aaron

    She's right. My in-laws use to live in Albuquerque, NM. Surrounded by Reservations. I was shocked to see the despair in the Native American population there. Until, I went to a Wal-Mart and Walgreens. No wonder they have drinking problems. These two chain stores actually have Liquor Stores in their NM stores. They are bombarded with booze. They really have to attack the Booze problem, which would help the job problem, which would help their poverty problem. Change the name of that damn team and any other racist team Mascot in the country. You hear me Ole Miss Rebels?

    October 19, 2013 at 1:45 pm | Reply
  17. Yuck

    Indians have been having a problems since this nation have been founded....look up the word MALICE......until now our people are still being lied to,killed....take a look at the American history and you'll find who's the true enemy of this nation.we are the care takers of the land.

    October 19, 2013 at 11:57 am | Reply
  18. Kathy

    What nobody addressed in this clip: How the continued characterization of Native Americans in popular culture contributes to those "real problems" to which Cupp keeps referring.

    October 19, 2013 at 9:32 am | Reply
  19. Zachary astakeesic

    Redskin is derogatory ,compared to pita referred back to animals a throwback offense. Now the question is it offensive of course originally as a bounty to collect our scalps insulting and as the topic arrises I'm a activist to change the name. I myself a full blood native american from the okanogan tribe, I'm 15 years old and understand the logic in this nonsense!.

    October 19, 2013 at 5:59 am | Reply
  20. Brian

    Being Native American, would I be offended If you met my family and I on the street and you called us Redskins? Ignorance must be bliss.

    October 19, 2013 at 1:35 am | Reply
  21. ROBERT WESTIN

    No team nickname is chosen to be offensive. That makes no sense. Team nicknames are chosen to be positive affirmations of the team and their fans. Nicknames honor the traditions of an area. People are proud of their heritages. I would think more people would be offended if the name was changed.

    October 19, 2013 at 12:29 am | Reply
    • Richard Eckert, Ph.D.

      In my published essay Wennebojo Meets the Mascot, I use a trickster to act as a social critic of mascots. In that essay, I suggest that if Natives were to use a crucifix that opened up like a jack in the box with popcorn flying everywhere and you then objected, would you really be satisfied if I said, "I am honoring your dude? Corn is considered sacred to me. I am honoring your dude. What's the problem?" I doubt that those who identify themselves as connected to Christianity would be very happy. My guess is that they would want to tell me that what I perceive as honoring their dude isn't honoring him at all. There is nothing honorable about the Washington logo and all the trademarks that Mr. Snyder profits from. That he has fan support is simply community based support for racism. It sends a message to kids that racism is ok. Is that really the message you want for your kids? Your community?

      October 20, 2013 at 4:08 pm | Reply
  22. kay

    Well, OK, but as of today, Washington is the offensive part of the name, Washington Redskins. I think there could be a naming contest worthy of a Jon Stewart riff. I will now take my imagination off-line. kt

    October 18, 2013 at 11:54 pm | Reply
  23. Jerry

    REDSKINS forever. If all you people have to worry about is the name of a football team that has not changed in my many years on this earth you really need to get a life.

    October 18, 2013 at 11:53 pm | Reply
    • Richard Eckert, Ph.D.

      Those defending racism, and that is what race-based mascots symbolize, should wonder what is accomplished by their orgasm of intellectual anarchy. Racism is ugly. Why defend the ugly? Defending the ugly is having a life? Seems more like hangover.

      October 20, 2013 at 4:11 pm | Reply
      • A Godbodian

        The saddest thing is for all of your doctorate and politically correct thoughts, you forget three major facts; 1.) Although some may find it offensive, the vast majority of Native Americans do not. Its kinda like that movie Django where everyone white or black used the N word gratuitously, the NAACP had an issue but the majority of African Americans had no issue with the movie and often enjoyed the film. 2.) As such THIS IS THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE and much like the ENGLISH LANGUAGE context, purposely construed and implied IS KING. Its the reason Caucasian so desiring to use the N word are so confused. Because we as African Americans in the majority determine its value. Its much like women being able to use the B word with their closest friends but all men knowing that our usage of the word towards them is taboo. See the context provided is the fact that in the majority, Native Americans could care less. As a person who is a decendant of both the African American race and Cherokee as my great grandmother was full blooded Cherokee woman whos immediate family escaped relocation by working the docks of New Orleans. We have always been intouch with our family that resides in Oklahoma and New Orleans. Being that we relocated from the deep South to DC. We've been fans for sometime and ALL of our family are REDSKINS fans. We often send our family members jerseys that they cannot acquire there. And lastly, 3.) What appalls me the most about your self-righteous claim to assist my people, while you use BOTH SIDES of my ancestry to prove your point, THE TERM REDSKIN DID NOT BEGIN RACIALLY as my people's skin is NOT RED. The term originated when Europeans settlers saw that some other Indian tribes would decorate themselves with Red Ocre or Vermillion. It had nothing to do with race, although it can be argued that it was cultural. NOW what WE/I do find negative or disparaging is the use of words like savage or INDIAN as we were never either.

        While I appreciate what you're attempting to say and do, you don't speak for all of us and you're not right. Racism isn't as black and white as you make it, which some would argue demonstrates that you yourself know nothing of real racism. REAL RACISM IS MORE THAN NAME CALLING, REAL RACISM IS MURDER, CENTURIES OF OPPRESSION, DEGRADATION BY LAWS THAT FAR MEANT TO BE JUST, ET CETERA. You're just someone trying to do the right thing, not realizing that those people that are offended ARE SPEAKING and the ones that are silent, are so FOR A EQUALLY JUSTIFIABLE REASON.

        October 21, 2013 at 4:18 am |
  24. brenda

    Nothing wrong with the Washington Redskins name. I found Larry Elder to be a terrific speaker and I would like to see him again. Norton was ridiculous and S.E. Cupp is great as always. Can't stand the other guy.

    October 18, 2013 at 10:02 pm | Reply
    • Kathy

      One word: myopic

      October 19, 2013 at 9:33 am | Reply
  25. Archie

    1st off Native Americans are not Indians, That's what lost ass (Wrong way Wilson)Chis Columbus called them when he got over here, thinking he was in India
    Native Americans referred to themselves as the people, No matter what Tribe they were associated with.
    Me myself I'm part Afro American and part Ozark Blackfoot and proud of it and take offence to the redskin slur. although I like the color scheme and logo of the Washington team I think the Owner could change the name to something like the Warriors. Staying in step with names like the Raiders and Buccaneers which are not racist.

    Archie Floyd
    Lansing,MI

    October 18, 2013 at 9:56 pm | Reply
  26. angela castillo

    please change the name. it is offensive.

    October 18, 2013 at 8:55 pm | Reply

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